Entering into Holy Week

04-14-2019Liturgy CornerCheryl Manfredonia

 HOLY THURSDAY    GOOD FRIDAY    HOLY SATURDAY    EASTER SUNDAY

These are the highest, holiest days celebrated each year by the Church beginning with the evening Mass of the Lord’s Supper on Holy Thursday through Easter Sunday. It is called the “Easter Triduum” or Paschal Triduum”. We celebrate the great Paschal mystery of Christ’s crucifixion, burial, and resurrection.

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Tenebrae

04-07-2019Liturgy Corner

The word "Tenebrae" comes from Latin, meaning "darkness" or "shadows". This dramatic, moving service dates back to the 4th century when monks and nuns chanted the ancient psalms and lamentations in the darkness of night.

Tenebrae is an extended meditation on the last 3 days of Holy Week. Psalms, readings, chants and motets express heavy grief, the Church's desolation; all is sad and mournful. Somber, yes, but it just might become your favorite church service as it awakens a sense of awe and wonder at the great Mysteries contained within Holy Week and Easter. Candles are extinguished as the evening progresses; you might just hear the shutting of Christ's tomb or the earthquake at the time of the resurrection! But, wait for it...(spoiler alert) We all know the ending. Jesus was victorious over death. His light can overcome any darkness.

Reading the Bible Shouldn't be Hard: Sixteen Bible Reading Rules Everyone Should Know (Plus One)

03-24-2019Liturgy Corner

Rule 1: The Bible's human authors were not divine stenographers. Everything asserted in Scripture is asserted by the Holy Spirit, but God allowed the human authors of Scripture to incorporate their own words, ideas, and worldviews into the sacred texts.

Rule 2: The Bible's human authors were not writing scientific textbooks. Scripture does not assert a scientific description of the world, so details in the Bible that utilize "the language of appearances" are not erroneous.

Rule 3: The Bible contains many different literary styles. The Bible contains many different genres, some of which communicate true, historical facts through the use of poetic, non-literal language.

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Why we should take St Joseph as our role model this Lent

03-17-2019Liturgy Corner

Just like Christ's foster father, we can draw strength from the Lord if we deny ourselves worldly pleasures Catholics know that 19 March is the Feast of St Joseph. Fewer, perhaps, are aware that the entire month of March is dedicated to the Most Chaste Heart.

That seems a bit odd, doesn't it? March is dominated by the Lenten fast, which is itself a preparation for Eastertide. According to tradition, Our Lord's foster-father didn't live to see his public ministry. In fact, it was necessary that St Joseph pass from this life before Christ could reveal Himself. Only then would Jesus become head of the royal House of David – both God and King by birthright.

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Are Catholics Really not Supposed to Chew The Eucharist?

03-10-2019Liturgy Corner

With the resurgence in the Extraordinary Form of the Mass and Catholic tradition in general, here's a question that has had come up in recent years: are Catholics supposed to avoid chewing the Eucharistic host in their mouth?

Maybe you've heard people say "you shouldn't chew the Eucharist like bubble gum," or claim that it's sacrilege to chew the Eucharist rather than let it dissolve in your mouth.

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Are Catholics Really not Supposed to Chew The Eucharist?

03-10-2019Liturgy Corner

With the resurgence in the Extraordinary Form of the Mass and Catholic tradition in general, here's a question that has had come up in recent years: are Catholics supposed to avoid chewing the Eucharistic host in their mouth?

Maybe you've heard people say "you shouldn't chew the Eucharist like bubble gum," or claim that it's sacrilege to chew the Eucharist rather than let it dissolve in your mouth.

Yet that vast majority of Catholics do chew the host. What is a faithful Catholic to do?

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Why Do Catholics Genuflect Each Time Before the Tabernacle and Kneel During Mass?

03-03-2019Liturgy Corner

The 1985 Extraordinary Synod of Bishops asserted “that the liturgy must favor the sense of the sacred and make it shine forth. It must be permeated by the spirit of reverence, adoration, and the glory of God.” To foster such a spirit, the Church has prescribed certain gestures and actions, especiallytoward the Blessed Sacrament.

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